The Weblog

This weblog contains LocallyGrown.net news and the weblog entries from all the markets currently using the system.

To visit the authoring market’s website, click on the market name located in the entry’s title.



 
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GFM :  Going out of Business


Do I have your attention now ?

Going out of Business ?  ABSOLUTELY NOT !  No we are not going out of business. We are planning bigger and better things for Greeneville Farmers Market.

In the meantime come check out all the Fresh Local Produce we have available at our market. We  also have a wide variety of homemade goodness, in the form of baked goods and crafts.

Also put on your Calendar for Saturday, August 17, 9:30 am, the Crazy Coupon lady is holding  classes to help you save money on your everyday necessities. . You will find the registration form on our website.

Fresh Harvest, LLC:  Fresh Harvest for August 11th




Market News

Hello!
Is Thanksgiving week getting close? That’s my annual vacation time, but it seems so far away. Some family members think that it’s a good idea to take a summer vacation like normal people. They have slowly won me over, so maybe next year.

The potato harvest saga continues. There is a tendency among some farmers (not naming names) to get carried away with how many pounds of potatoes to plant each year. The potato seed catalog lists over 30 different varieties and they all sound fantastic. I only planted 5 different varieties this year, but ordered 50 lbs. per type, planting about 1500 feet of potatoes. It has been a productive year, but it does take time to harvest. The beauty of growing potatoes is that you don’t have to dig them up all at once. They continue to grow underground after the plant has died. As I recently complained to Anson: “When will we ever finish harvesting all of these potatoes? He responded: “You’re the one who ordered 250 lbs. of seed!” We’re about 2/3 done. The good news is that the Nashville Food Project can probably use the excess taters.

Bloomy Rind needs another week to get settled in their new location. They should have lots of goodies next week.

Dozen Bakery cookies and breads, eggs, granola, honey, and coffee are in abundance.

You have until Tuesday night to place your order.
Thanks for your support, and I will see you on Wednesday!

If you need to text me, my number is 615-838-0428.

John

Recipes

Athens Locally Grown:  ALG Market Open for August 15


Athens Locally Grown

How to contact us:
Our Website: athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/athenslocallygrown
On Thursdays: Here’s a map.

Market News

The new school year brings many new people to Athens, and many new people to Athens Locally Grown, so I thought this week I’d give a brief primer on how ALG works. Those of you who have been with us during these last seventeen years probably already know all this, but I’ll try to keep it interesting for you too. In January, I’ll spend several weeks going into much more detail about all this.

First off, ALG is best thought of like a traditional farmers market, because except for the lack of tents and tables that’s very much how we operate. The growers are putting their own items up for sale directly to you, at prices and quantities they have set. The market volunteers and I are here to make sure it all happens smoothly, but the growers are selling their products directly to you. Growers do have to apply to sell through the market, and I personally approve each of them before they list their products. Here’s a summary of the standards we have set:

  • All growers must use sustainable practices and never use synthetic fertilizers or pesticides.
  • All growers can only sell what they themselves have grown or made
  • All growers must be from the greater Athens area. Right now, this means within about 50 miles
  • All animals raised for meat or eggs must be pastured
  • Handicrafts must be made primarily from items produced or gathered on the farm
  • Prepared foods must use organic ingredients if at all possible, and locally grown ingredients if at all possible
  • All proper licenses, when required by law, must be obtained
  • All growers must first participate in the market for a few weeks as customers, so they can clearly see how it all works

When I’ve turned down requests to sell through ALG (and I have turned down many), the items clearly broke one or more of those standards. There are a few edge cases that I take on a case by case basis, such as coffee. In cases like that, we set the standards as strict as we can. With coffee, for example, the beans must be sustainably grown, they must be roasted locally, and the roaster must have a direct business relationship with the farm that grew the beans.

So, the growers list their available products and set their prices. For most all of the products, they do this before they’ve harvested the items, so they have to estimate how much they will actually have. They’ve gotten pretty good at this guess, but it is a guess, and the unpredictable nature of farming means they may have far less than they thought (thanks to deer, a hail storm, etc.) or they may have far more than they thought (a nice rain can double the growth of lettuce overnight, for example). Most of them are conservative with their estimates, and so they let you continue to order even if they’ve already sold more than they guessed they’d have. That’s why popular items may have a quantity in the negatives when you look at the listings. The system will still let you order on the chance that they’ll actually have enough, but you’ll get warnings along the way that you’re taking a gamble.

I do not collect items from the farms, and do not know myself until Thursday afternoon what the growers were able to harvest and bring in to town. The growers do have each other’s contact information, so if one grower is short and another has a surplus, they may arrange with each other to get all the orders filled, but in general, if a grower cannot fill an order for something, they’ll remove that ordered item and you’ll see a comment on your invoice indicating that. Since I’m not a middle-man, I can’t arrange for substitutions myself.

When the growers bring in the items you ordered on Thursday afternoon, packaged and labelled with your name, I pay them on your behalf out of our shared cash box during the hour before we open the market for their sales from the previous week. Then, you arrive and pay into the cashbox for your order this week. We deposit the money you pay (via cash, check, or credit) into our bank account so it will be there when we write checks as the cycle begins anew. As explained elsewhere on the website, you are really ordering directly from and paying the growers yourself, but our shared cashbox system makes things convenient for you and them. (Imagine if you ordered from ten growers having to write ten checks when you picked up your items!) This shared cashbox system does mean that if you place an order and then never arrive to pick it up, we’re left holding the bag. For that reason, you are responsible for paying for orders not picked up, and that amount is automatically added on to your next order for your convenience. We do accept credit card payments on the website, and many customers take advantage of that and skip the pay table. The cards don’t actually get charged until after pickups on Thursday, so your charge will reflect any adjustments that had to get made along the way.

For a number of legal reasons, ALG never takes possession of your ordered items. We don’t buy them from the growers and resell them to you, nor do we repackage them in any way. The growers drop off your items for you, and you arrive and pick them up. The market volunteers facilitate that happening. Because of the need to maintain that separation, we cannot deliver, nor can we generally hold your items later than 8pm on Thursday if you fail to come pick them up. We start calling those who haven’t arrived by 7:30, and quite often we just get answering machines and voice mail. Anything still at our pickup location at 8pm will get divided up among those there at the time, primarily our volunteers, and then we finish loading up the truck and leave. There are some things you can do to insure you won’t get charged for things you didn’t come get:

1. If you know prior to Tuesday at 8pm that you won’t be able to come get your order or send someone in your place, send me an email and I will cancel your order.
2. If you find out later that you can’t come, send me an email. So long as I know before market begins, I can put the things you ordered on the “extras” table, and your fellow customers will almost certainly buy them for you.
3. If you discover Thursday while we’re at market that you can’t arrive, give me a call at 706-248-1860. I’ll put your items on the “extras” table, and if they sell, you’ll be off the hook.
4. If you have a cell phone, make sure that number is the number on your account. You can go to the “Your Account” page on the website to be sure. If you’re out and about and I get your home phone or your work phone, no one gets helped.

Finally, ours is a paperless system, so we do not have paper receipts for you when you pick up your order. An electronic receipt is generated, though, and can be found on the website. Go to the “Your Account” page, view your order history, and you’ll see an invoice for each order. By 2pm on Thursday, it will show what we expect to have for you that evening. After we fill your order, it will show exactly what we packed for you, and what, if anything, was missing. You can view that at any time, even years from now. If we didn’t get you something we should have, or if anything you got was of unacceptable quality, please contact me ASAP. I’ll share the problem with the grower so we can insure it won’t happen again. If you’re logged into the site, most of the growers have their contact info on their profile page (off the “Our Growers” page), so you can contact them directly if you choose.

Thank you so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown, all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Other Area Farmers Markets

The Athens Farmers Market is open on Saturdays at Bishop Park, and Wednesday evenings downtown at Creature Comforts. You can catch the news on their website. The West Broad Farmers Market is back as well, Saturdays from 9 to 1, and you can watch for weekly news here: http://www.athenslandtrust.org/west-broad-farmers-market/. The Comer Farmers’ Market is open on Saturday mornings from 9am to noon. Check www.facebook.com/comerfm for more information. The Oconee County farmers market is held every Saturday 8 to noon in downtown Watkinsville. Washington, GA also has a lovely little Saturday market, running on Saturdays from 9 to 2pm. You can learn all about them here: www.washingtonfarmersmkt.com Folks to the east can check out the Hartwell Farmers Market, which starts bright and early on Saturday morning from 7am to noon, and Tuesday afternoons from 11 to 3pm. If you know of any other area markets operating, please let me know.

All of these other markets are separate from ALG (including the Athens Farmers Market) but many growers sell at multiple markets. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest, and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Fresh Harvest, LLC:  Fresh Harvest for August 11th




Market News

Hello!
Is Thanksgiving week getting close? That’s my annual vacation time, but it seems so far away. Some family members think that it’s a good idea to take a summer vacation like normal people. They have slowly won me over, so maybe next year.

The potato harvest saga continues. There is a tendency among some farmers (not naming names) to get carried away with how many pounds of potatoes to plant each year. The potato seed catalog lists over 30 different varieties and they all sound fantastic. I only planted 5 different varieties this year, but ordered 50 lbs. per type, planting about 1500 feet of potatoes. It has been a productive year, but it does take time to harvest. The beauty of growing potatoes is that you don’t have to dig them up all at once. They continue to grow underground after the plant has died. As I recently complained to Anson: “When will we ever finish harvesting all of these potatoes? He responded: “You’re the one who ordered 250 lbs. of seed!” We’re about 2/3 done. The good news is that the Nashville Food Project can probably use the excess taters.

Bloomy Rind needs another week to get settled in their new location. They should have lots of goodies next week.

Dozen Bakery cookies and breads, eggs, granola, honey, and coffee are in abundance.

You have until Tuesday night to place your order.
Thanks for your support, and I will see you on Wednesday!

If you need to text me, my number is 615-838-0428.

John

Recipes

Yalaha, FL:  Planting for fall


Hard to believe it with the heat and humidity but we have already started planting out cool weather crops.

Order now through 5 pm Thursday August 15th for Sat August 17th Pickup, or tell me when you want to pick up, we usually have some flexibility.

Remember to tell me when you want to pick up!

Sign in to order. https://yalaha.locallygrown.net/market

You have to sign in to see the add to cart button. Then set the number and click the add to cart button on the items you want to buy (it is the little picture right next to the quantity box.) Remember you need to check out before your order will be placed.
Remember to let me know when you want to pick up on Sat or maybe even Friday late afternoon or on Sunday. (If I don’t send you an e-mail confirmation of your order and pick up time, please make sure you checked out and completed your order.)

Green Acres Atkins:  Opening bell...


So sorry for the tardy opening bell!

It has been a crazy busy day at the farm

Please place your orders by noon on Wednesday

Thanks
Tom and kami

Dawson Local Harvest:  8:00 is Opening Time for Dawson Market!


NOTABLE RECENT ADDITIONS to the Dawson Local Harvest include new Fermentations from CULTURED TRADITIONS such as Passionfruit Turmeric Ginger and CBD infused Holy Basil JUNS, a new Coconut Kefir “soft cheese”, and delicious fermented Ginger Carrots, plus some Sauerkraut and Garlic Dill Pickles are 25% Off!!

Elsewhere, BACK IN TIME FARM has a SALE going on their all-natural Chicken Backs & Carcasses. You might not want to serve this as your main dinner course but it is a wonderful base for easy to make Chicken Broth. Oxtail is one of the similar Beef offerings from SOUTHERN GRASS MEAT, an excellent soup base, too.

Still lots of Produce like Green Beans, Okra, and Zucchini, Baked Goods like Blackberry Lemon Cheese Bars from Daily Bread, and too much else to mention!

CHECK THE MARKET LISTINGS NOW and PLACE YOUR ORDERS!

Russellville Community Market:  Ordering Closes at 10PM on the Market!


To ensure your order is placed, make sure you click the “Place My Order” button once you have completed your shopping. You will receive a confirmation email.

Orders will be ready for pick from 4PM – 6:30PM this Tuesday at the Downtown Russellville Train Depot!

Ordering Closes at 10PM on The Market!
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Fresh Homemade Salsa, watermelon, apples, squash, okra, chicken breast, NY Strip Steak, breads, pastries, locally made and sourced body care products, eggs, jams, jellies, and more are all available on The Market this week!
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Thank you for choosing to shop and eat local.

Russellville Community Market

FRESH.LOCAL.ONLINE

The Wednesday Market:  Here's Your Weekly Reminder to Order


Good afternoon.

The Wednesday Market is open for orders. Please place your order by 10 p.m. Monday. Orders are ready for pick up between 3 and 6 p.m. Wednesday. See the website for this week’s product offerings. Here is the link: https://wednesdaymarket.locallygrown.net/market

The heat index around here is at least 100 degrees today. If you are going to be outside, take it easy and stay hydrated!

Have a great day, and we’ll see you at the Market.

Thanks,

Beverly

Magney Legacy Ridge Farm:  CSA #19


Dear CSA-ers,

This week’s preassembled bag will include Malabar Spinach, Radishes (last round for a few weeks), Hot Peppers Mix, Listada Eggplant, Romaine, Mixed Tomatoes, Green Beans, and Tulsi Basil. Custom orders should be placed between now and Tuesday evening on the website at: https://magneyfarm.locallygrown.net/market

This coming week promises to be a really hot one and we are already intending to take some precautions to protect our employees from the extreme midday heat. That also means it’s going to be really hot for our plants, which is unfortunate, but kind of par-for-the-course in August. If you’ve been following the water-line replacement saga, you will be happy to hear that the new line is live and is so far working very well, though we are still chasing down some issues with the recycled frost-free pipes in individual tunnels. With luck that will all be resolved by the extreme heat of Monday.
August and September are challenging months in Kentucky. Summer vegetables are beginning to lose steam and fall ones are not yet big enough to harvest. Historically this has been a real challenge for the farm, but this year we feel we are better prepared. This is partially due to Patrick and Hannah’s efforts to chase down the details and perform the tedious calculations involved with midseason nutrition management for our solanaceous crops. Essentially, crops that grow and produce for many months like tomatoes, eggplants, and peppers begin to use up the soil amendments they were originally given. Using precisely mixed amount of organic liquid fertilizers applied via our water conserving drip irrigation, the plants can be given the boost they need to keep growing delicious vegetables.
This week’s highlighted vegetable is the pepper. We’re growing a wide assortment of peppers this year. We have 3 different sweet peppers, a full bell, a baby bell, and a long horn-shaped Italian heirloom called ‘Corno di Toro’. For hot peppers, we have a hot Jalapeno (green), a Poblano (dark green), and a Slavic heirloom called ‘Czech Black’ which is nearly black. Of those, Jalapenos are the hottest, with the Czech Black and Poblano being less hot respectively. Due to getting a late start on peppers, most will come to you this week tender and green, but as the season goes on, you’ll start to see more color, particularly with the sweet peppers. We hope you enjoy our selection, and we’d really like to hear your input on our pepper varieties at some point. There are so many types of peppers, we’d love to get some customer feedback on which ones you want to see us grow in the future.
As always, we thank you for your dedication and support to our farm. We’re so happy to be a part of your community.
Sincerely,
The Magney Legacy Ridge Farm Team